How did you begin your career in the photo industry?

I’ve always loved cameras, that’s what got me into my first photography class. My family has a background in the preforming arts, so I wanted something artistically stimulating, but also wasn’t the life of an undiscovered, tortured artist, because I didn’t like the idea of being broke all the time. Advertising photography seemed like a great idea, so after college I enrolled at the Creative Circus and set to work filling the education gaps and learning how to assist, retouch, work with the gear, and the industry in general.

At what point in your career did you realize you wanted to become a digital tech?

In my first year of advertising school, I saw a Mamiya RZ67 fitted with a Phase digital back, and my mind was blown. I didn’t know which job meant that you got to handle that kind of camera and tech, but I wanted to be that person. At the time I knew very little about medium format, even less about digital backs, but I thought it was the coolest.

How do you market your skills and brand to photographers?

The majority of my work comes from word of mouth and networking. There’s a lot of work to be had, and most of my new clients come as referrals.

What are some of the highlights of your work?

Any time I have a situation that needs to be figured out and a solution found is a highlight for me. I love puzzles, and this is no different, even if I need help getting the answer. Sorting out a new camera rig to work around a difficult shooting task, troubleshooting a weird DB behavior, refining a post production process for more efficiency, it’s all great in my book. Every encounter is a learning opportunity and more experience I take with me.

What are your essentials on set?

A med kit with Batman Band-Aids is always in my bag. There’s a lot of “the usual” since those are the tools of the trade, so I try to set myself apart by thinking outside the box. I’ll bring 1-2 random items that might be useful to the photo crew or client that I think also make a good talking point should anyone notice. Camping chair, mophie charger, super tiny A clamps, hand warmers, Airborn tablets, or something a little off the wall that might be relevant to the day’s work. I brought a lava lamp as a joke for the client once and it ended up in the photo!

What brought you to Capture Integration and what keeps you loyal to our brand?

Initially it was for training. I wanted to know more in-depth about Capture One Pro, so I started reading blogs and attending their training sessions as new versions were released. Eventually they offered Phase One Certification near me, so I jumped in to learn more about what’s under the hood from the pros.

Knowledge and trust keeps me loyal to Capture Integration. Pretty simple, but that goes a long way in a world where forums and support tickets can take forever to be resolved, and you end up with a random employee each time asking your life’s history just to be told to run the most basic of troubleshooting steps. I know who I’m dealing with, and I know that I won’t be wasting my time.

Connect with Kathryn

Websitekschambach.com

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